Starting ’em Young

Young Athletes engages families by highlighting the power of play. Young Athletes includes a series of structured physical activities, songs and games to teach basic motor development skills for children with and without intellectual disabilities, ages 2 to 7 years old. BY REBECCA RALSTON In a small community near Phitsanulok, Thailand, a young boy named Kongpob Yangkam lives with his grandparents and 17-year-old sister. Kong, as his family lovingly calls him, has intellectual disabilities and […]

The Sexual Assault Epidemic No One Talks About

Heard on All Things Considered Joseph Shapiro     Editor’s note: This report includes graphic and disturbing descriptions of assault. Pauline wants to tell her story — about that night in the basement, about the boys and about the abuse she wanted to stop. But she’s nervous. “Take a deep breath,” she says out loud to herself. She takes a deep and audible breath. And then she tells the story of what happened on the […]

Training First Responders To Respond Bettter

“The SNAP Program makes a vital contribution to the armamentarium of best practices addressing the unique needs of special populations and their ability to thrive and participate in the community. It will become a time-honored component in the first responders’ toolkit.” – Rick Rader, MD, Medical Liaison, SNAP Program BY BRUCE GARNER Even under the best of circumstances, it is challenging to be a good parent, but when your child has special needs, it gets […]

Transitions: Moving from pediatric care to adult care can be tricky. Here are eight questions to ask your doctor to facilitate the process.

Kritz, Fran Neurology Now: October/November 2017 – Volume 13 – Issue 5 – p 10–11 Many neurologic diseases, such as epilepsy, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular dystrophy, or Down syndrome, begin in childhood when patients are seen by pediatric neurologists. What happens when these patients age into adulthood? Do they stay with their pediatric specialist or switch to a neurologist who treats adults or both children and adults? The accepted wisdom is to transition to doctors […]

National Down Syndrome Society Launches National Campaign Spotlighting Laws that Prevent Individuals with Down Syndrome from Seeking Careers

The National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS), a human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome, will soon bring together community leaders, self-advocates, parents and employers to launch their latest campaign – Law Syndrome. NDSS’ Law Syndrome campaign will help launch October as Down Syndrome Awareness Month and National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Law Syndrome directly addresses the challenges faced by people with Down syndrome who desire to fulfill career goals, get married and live […]

Enhancing Lives Of People With Down Syndrome

BY SARA HART WEIR, MS The National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS) is the leading human rights organization for individuals with Down syndrome. NDSS envisions a world in which all people with Down syndrome have the opportunity to enhance their quality of life, realize their life aspirations and become valued members of welcoming communities. Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition. One in every 691 babies in the United States is born with Down […]

Practice Without Pressure

Practice Without Pressure™ greatly reduces and, most times, eliminates the need for sedation and restraint. The PWP model includes the individual, the family/caregiver, and the clinican, and introduces the PWP practice specialist into the paradigm. BY DEBORAH JASTREBSKI THE NEED You wake up one morning and your tooth hurts. Although it’s not your favorite thing you call your dentist, make an appointment and go get it fixed. You’re nervous but you tell the dentist that, […]

A Holistic Guide For Families Who Have A Loved One With Special Needs

PUBLIC BENEFITS BY CALEB HARTY Many important benefits are outlined below, but not all. Also, effort has been made to point out important aspects of the programs, but outlining every detailed exception, rule, etc., is beyond the scope of this informational guide. For context, most of these programs are “means-tested,” which means they are usually not available until the child turns 18 because up until that point the parents’ assets and income are taken into […]

Where Do We Go from Here?

MAKING INFORMED DECISIONS ABOUT SPECIAL EDUCATION DISPUTE RESOLUTION BY WILLIAM BLACKWELL, ED.D. Planning special education services is a collaborative process involving parents, children, and school personnel. While the majority of individualized education programs (IEPs) are developed collaboratively, there are situations in which disagreements arise that are not easily resolved. Parents are sometimes left asking themselves, “Where do we go from here?” following an unsuccessful attempt at resolving differences with school personnel. Our federal special education […]

Transitioning From Pre-school To Elementary School, And Beyond:

STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES BY DIANE WISCARSON, WISCARSON LAW As a parent of a child with special needs, you may be particularly anxious about sending your child to elementary school. After all, you want to make sure that your incoming kindergartner gets the full benefit of a public school education, and has a positive experience in the process. Prior to your differently-abled child reaching kindergarten age, they will have likely been getting services through […]