Bullying and Children with Disabilities and Special Health Needs

Children with disabilities—such as physical, developmental, intellectual, emotional, and sensory disabilities—are at an increased risk of being bullied. Any number of factors— physical vulnerability, social skill challenges, or intolerant environments—may increase the risk. Research suggests that some children with disabilities may bully others as well. Kids with special health needs, such as epilepsy or food allergies, also may be at higher risk of being bullied. Bullying can include making fun of kids because of their […]

A Few Thoughts about Relationships

by Amy Petulla, Partners in Policymaking® 2001-02 Graduate As parents of children and adults with disabilities, we spend a lot of time dealing with things we consider essential, like education, services, and medical care. The list goes on and on, as do the books, workshops, and materials you can find on those subjects. But there is one important area in anyone’s life that does not get much attention: RELATIONSHIPS. While everyone has to deal with […]

Increase in Developmental Disabilities Among Children in the United States

Pediatrics has published a new study that describes how often developmental disabilities were diagnosed among children in the United States, and trends over time. In this study, scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) found that 17% of children aged 3–17 years had a developmental disability, and importantly, that this percentage increased over the two time periods compared, 2009–2011 and 2015–2017; increases were also […]

Two quantitative studies find that black students are under-identified for disabilities at school

Decades of research have documented that students of color, particularly black children, are disproportionately classified by schools as having disabilities. In 2016, 12 percent of black children across the nation received services at school for disabilities ranging from emotional disturbances to physical disabilities to intellectual impairment. Only 8.5 percent of white children received those services. The disability rate for Hispanic students — 9.4 percent nationally — is only slightly higher than for whites and the disparity […]

Why students with disabilities are capable of graduating on time. This is why they’re not.

U.S. education system is failing students with special needs. by Sarah Butrymowicz  and  Jackie Mader As a teenager, Michael McLaughlin wanted to go to college. He had several disabilities, including dyslexia and bipolar disorder, which threatened to make the road ahead more difficult. He sometimes had trouble paying attention in class and understanding directions. He also had an IQ of 115 — on the upper ranges of what is considered average. With help, he should […]

Benefits for Military Families with Special Needs

There are federal and state programs committed to providing additional assistance for families with special needs. As a military family, you also can count on the support of the Exceptional Family Member Program, or EFMP, and Military OneSource special needs specialty consultants. Supplemental Security Income Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is a federal program that helps to covers the basic needs for people with disabilities who have little or no income. SSI provides cash payments […]

NYU Dentistry Opens Oral Health Center for People With Disabilities

Individuals with physical, cognitive and developmental disabilities now have a dedicated treatment center in New York City for oral health care—NYU College of Dentistry’s (NYU Dentistry) Oral Health Center for People with Disabilities. The 8,000-square-foot center, located in NYU Dentistry’s Weissman Building, provides much-needed comprehensive care for patients whose disabilities or medical conditions prevent them from receiving care in a conventional dental setting. “The NYU Dentistry Oral Health Center for People with Disabilities addresses a […]

How to Receive Financial Compensation via Medicaid to Provide Care for a Loved One

It is very common for family, especially spouses and adult children, as well as close friends to serve as informal (unpaid) caregivers for loved ones who are frail and elderly, disabled, or suffer from dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, according to the Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA), nearly 80% of adults who live at home and receive long-term care assistance depend solely on relatives and friends. Unfortunately, the role of informal caregiver isn’t an […]

Schools Must Protect Students with Disabilities from Sexual Harassment

Supporting students with disabilities means addressing sexual harassment, including sexual assault. Students with disabilities are more likely than their peers to experience sexual harassment, less likely to report it, and more likely to be pushed out of school as a result of sexual harassment. Schools must meet their obligations to address sexual harassment under both Title IX—the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in schools—and laws that protect the civil rights of students with disabilities. […]

Strategies for July 4th for Special Needs Kids

The 4th of July is an exciting holiday, but for special needs kids it can all be a bit too much. Think about it: fireworks are basically EXPLOSIONS! Things blowing up can be challenging for someone who is sensitive to loud noises. Also, fireworks can’t happen until nightfall, which may mean staying up late. For typical kids that may be a treat, but some special needs kids find a disruption in daily routine very upsetting. […]