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Bringing the Family’s Voice to Research: How Families Contribute to Research (Part Two)

by: Lisa Diller, Seattle, Washington, Paula Drew, Edmond, Oklahoma, Marquitha Gilbert, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nancy Ford, Atlanta, Georgia, tina hjorngaard, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Kim Rayfield, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Barbara Taylor, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania This is the second of a two-part article about our experiences as parent members of the On-Track Study research team. In this article we reflect on how our engagement in the research process evolved over four years and about the benefits of including parents as members […]

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Neglected for Too Long: Dental Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

National Council on Disability An independent federal agency making recommendations to the President and Congress to enhance the quality of life for all Americans with disabilities and their families. Neglected for Too Long: Dental Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Fall 2017 This policy brief is designed to provide insight concerning the lack of dental care many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD)[1] continue to experience due to a shortage of properly […]

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Forgetting Milestones and Learning to Measure Progress…a New Way of Thinking! #Interests/Talents

By Mary Ellen Bogucki When my daughter was diagnosed with Autism, I immediately started researching and learning all I could on the subject. One of the first people I learned about was Temple Grandin and I immediately became a big fan of hers. Temple provided insight into what my daughter was experiencing, long before Bree could communicate with me. There are so many things I learned from Temple, but one important lesson was to focus […]

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The Whole Story

PUZZLES & CAMO BY SHELLY HUHTANEN This is the story of autism that we need to hear, not just the young adult with autism that is a surgeon… We need to hear the whole story, no matter how uncomfortable it may be. A few weeks ago, a friend of mine asked me if I had seen the new show on television entitled The Good Doctor. I told them I hadn’t since I don’t watch too […]

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Engaging Students With Career Pathways

One successful high school employment initiative is Bridge to Employment – an innovative, early intervention career program developed by JEVS Human Services and funded by Kessler Foundation that helps high school students with disabilities transition successfully into employment. BY LAURA VIGLIONE, M.S. Around the U.S. organizations are creating and implementing employment programs for youth with disabilities that focus not only on job readiness and skills training, but also on transitional skills necessary for students moving […]

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Did you hear the big news?!

by Brandy Pavia I have been debating on whether or not to share the awesome news that we recently received. Like, big news. I couldn’t wait to tell everyone. The truth is, the news was so exciting to me, that I wanted to stop random people to tell them…but I’m going to venture a guess that Bob, the cashier at Wawa, wouldn’t have reciprocated my enthusiasm. Thanks a lot for the buzz kill, Bob; the coffee was good […]

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Camp Corral Has New Chief Development Officer

Camp Corral, a leading nonprofit advocate for military families, announced today that Lisa Brown has accepted the position as chief development officer. In this role, Brown will lead the organization’s fundraising efforts, with a primary goal to provide more military children with the opportunity of a lifetime. Since its inception in 2011, Camp Corral has provided a free week of summer camp to more than 17,000 children of wounded, injured, ill or fallen military veterans […]

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Simple “Life Hacks” For Students With Dyslexia

BY ANGELA SHAW Many parents understand that building resiliency and independence within their child will increase self-esteem, happiness, and success throughout life. However, children with dyslexia are faced daily with tasks that are extremely difficult for them and they often experience repeated failure when attempting these tasks (IDA, 2013). Therefore, anxiety is often the tenor of their lives and may be generalized in one or many aspects of their reality. Because of their vulnerability to […]

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How to make meetings with school staff work.

By Lynne Pearson If you are the parent of an autistic child the chances are high that you’ll have plenty of meetings with school staff. It’s always a good idea to go into meetings prepared and with an attitude that is the most likely to bring about a favourable outcome for your child, you and the school. Basically you are going to have to become a skilled negotiator. Recently  I read a famous book about […]

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Incidental Learning & The Deaf Child

BY J. FREEMAN KING, ED.D. Incidental learning might be defined as what a person learns through informal communicative interactions with others in public and educational settings. For children who can hear, incidental learning constitutes a major portion of their social development and world knowledge. However, for the deaf child, even though surrounded by this type of learning, it is often not accessible. There is extreme naivety on the part of parents and many school administrators […]