Schools Must Protect Students with Disabilities from Sexual Harassment

Supporting students with disabilities means addressing sexual harassment, including sexual assault. Students with disabilities are more likely than their peers to experience sexual harassment, less likely to report it, and more likely to be pushed out of school as a result of sexual harassment. Schools must meet their obligations to address sexual harassment under both Title IX—the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in schools—and laws that protect the civil rights of students with disabilities. […]

Williams Syndrome Disability Language Style Guide Recommendations

The WSA recommends using “people first” language as we do in our communications—language that puts the person before their diagnosis. For example, a person with a disability; not “disabled person” Individual with Williams syndrome. Not a “Williams syndrome person or child.” Put the person first. Never mention the disability at all unless it is pertinent to the conversation/communication. Families affected by Williams syndrome, and not WS families. We use the term “individual” quite a bit […]

ALS: ‘Unique’ cells could open up new avenues for therapy

By Maria Cohut Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that leads to the death of nerve cells that control movement, leaving people unable to move and, eventually, to breathe. ALS is fatal and, so far, incurable. Can new findings bring hope for novel therapies? ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States alone. Still, its causes remain largely unknown. There is currently no cure, […]

Forgetting Milestones and Learning to Measure Progress…a New Way of Thinking! #Overcoming — Part 2

By Mary Ellen Bogucki  I never thought my daughter, Kailey, would struggle in school. She was such a determined little girl who problem-solved at an early age. She was a little go getter and seemed to be so advanced for her age. Then it was time for kindergarten and she wasn’t learning her letters or numbers and didn’t want to learn to write her name. She was a great little student, making lots of friends, […]

Later-born siblings of children with autism or ADHD are at elevated risk for both disorders

(SACRAMENTO) — Later-born siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at elevated risk for both disorders, a new study led by Meghan Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and at the UC Davis MIND Institute, has concluded. The findings appear today in JAMA Pediatrics. The study suggests that families who already have a child diagnosed with ASD or ADHD may wish to monitor younger […]

What is stimming?

By Lori Smith BSN MSN CRNP Reviewed by Timothy J. Legg, PhD, CRNP Repetitive body movements or repetitive movement of objects is referred to as self-stimulatory behavior, abbreviated to stimming. Stimming can occur in people with autism and other developmental disabilities. Some people will stim when nervous, employing behaviors such as pacing, biting their nails, hair twirling, or tapping their feet or fingers. In this article, we will examine why stimming occurs and the different […]

High functioning autism through my eyes

Contrary to what professionals thought when I’d been diagnosed, I loved fiction and cultural critique. By Jonathan Rowland At the risk of explaining the obvious to the neurotypicals — people not on the autistic spectrum — in the audience, I know that I am not every autistic person. I can only speak of my experience as a thirtysomething white cis man who grew up in semirural Hertfordshire. This is still an autistic experience and, while […]

Forgetting Milestones and Learning to Measure Progress…a New Way of Thinking! #Overcoming — Part 1

By Mary Ellen Bogucki  In 2003, our family received two diagnoses, just weeks a part. The first was for our youngest daughter, Bree (then age 5), the diagnosis was an Autism Spectrum Disorder. The second diagnosis was for my middle daughter, Kailey (then age 8) and it was ADHD. Neither diagnosis was a surprise, because our girls had been struggling for years and we were working not only with the school district, but many different […]

Epilepsy Can Follow Traumatic Brain Injury

Did you know that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause epilepsy? Learn how to protect your brain. A traumatic brain injury (TBI) can happen to anyone, especially young children and older adults. TBIs can range from mild (such as concussions) to severe, life-threatening injuries. They can cause changes in: Thinking and memory; Sensations and balance; Language, such as talking and understanding; and Emotions, such as depression, anxiety, or aggression.1 TBIs can also cause epilepsy Epilepsy […]

Early intervention in autism improves language, IQ and social skills

Major study confirms pioneering treatment approach (SACRAMENTO) —Breakthrough research demonstrating that children with autism as young as 18 months can vastly improve their language, cognition and social skills with an early intervention developed by UC Davis Professor Sally Rogers has been replicated in a major new study. Sally Rogers working with a child Rogers, a professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the MIND Institute, began work on a novel developmental approach to autism in […]